Friends of Grasslands

supporting native grassy ecosystems

PO Box 440
Jamison Centre
Macquarie ACT 2614

email: advocacy@fog.org.au
web: www.fog.org.au

Local Land Services
State Operations
PO Box 2015
Dubbo NSW 2830
email: tsr.feedback@lls.nsw.gov.au

 

Dear Sir/Madam

NSW Travelling Stock Reserve Review

Friends of Grasslands (FOG) is a community group committed to the conservation of grassy ecosystems (grasslands and grassy woodlands) in south-eastern Australia, leading to its interest in the future of the travelling stock reserve (TSR) network in NSW. As well as interested members of the public, FOG’s membership includes NSW primary producers, native seed collectors, NSW and ACT government employees, professional scientists such as botanists, ecologists and other biological scientists, and field naturalists who have had a long history in studying, documenting, managing, and advocating for the biodiversity conservation values of grassy ecosystems. As TSRs in NSW contain some of the best samples remaining of grassy ecosystems, FOG has a great interest in the conservation of TSRs. FOG’s membership gives us a good understanding of TSR values and management issues. FOG advocates, educates and advises on matters to do with the conservation of grassy ecosystems, and carries out surveys and on-ground management work, and participates in advisory panels. Our members, in different roles, have undertaken field days and extensive surveys at numerous TSRs throughout NSW, provided information and management advice to TSR rangers, conducted large scale studies documenting their extent and biodiversity values.

FOG welcomes the opportunity to provide further input to the TSR review. FOG has been concerned about the future of those TSRs with high conservation values for some time. We have provided comments in January 2013 to the Crown Lands Review, in June 2014 to the Crown Lands Legislation White Paper, and in December 2015 to the NSW Travelling Stock Reserves – Draft State Planning Framework 2016-2019. Copies of these documents can be provided if needed.

In providing a response to the current consultation round, FOG is presenting general information about the importance of TSRs ecologically, particularly those containing excellent samples of endangered ecological communities. FOG contends that the values of some TSRs are of State-wide, national and even global, importance. We believe that TSRs of high conservation value may be significantly worthwhile offset sites for development of areas of similar habitat.

Major concerns with the discussion paper and the review include:

-   Not being placed into long-term grazing leases where grazing is not adequately controlled;

-   Include management that is sympathetic to the conservation values of the TSR.

Attachment A elaborates on these points and includes details of other concerns FOG has in regard to the discussion paper.

As well, in response to the questions about the State-wide assessment, FOG has put together details regarding some key TSRs in south-eastern NSW, based on the knowledge and experience of FOG members. Attachment B is a summary of this information for selected TSRs. Attachment C and the associated spreadsheet contains all the details FOG has been able to compile at this stage. We are aware that this is not a complete document, and cannot be taken to assume that sites not listed in these Attachments are not of the same quality.

Yours sincerely

 

Sarah Sharp
Advocacy coordinator

5 July 2017


Attachment A: detailed comments

TSRs as habitat for endangered ecological communities

The NSW Travelling Stock Reserves Review Public consultation paper must always be cognisant of how vital TSRs are in conserving endangered ecological communities (EECs). Most EECs on NSW's tablelands and slopes are found on the extensive agricultural lands and as such have suffered a great deal of degradation or destruction from agricultural activities: cropping, pasture modification, application of fertilisers, overgrazing, and continuing weed invasion. TSRs generally occur on low-lying productive lands. These lands are also habitat for the majority of EECs in NSW’s slopes and tablelands. The TSRs have been found to hold some of the best and largest remaining samples of these communities (see for example http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/communities/pubs/152-conservation-advice.pdf and http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/determinations/whiteboxyellowboxblakelys36a.htm. The TSRs in the NSW slopes and tablelands are thus critically important in conserving viable and large samples of the EECs. This is also largely due to the previous management that the TSRs have received. For example the pulse-grazing that occurred as a result of occasional mobs of travelling stock using the TSRs has resulted in the condition of the EECs on the TSRs being in good condition, relative to much of those which remain across the agricultural zones in the slopes and tablelands. TSRs have also generally escaped fertiliser application, pasture over-sowing using exotic perennial pasture grasses, cropping, and some of the major weed invasions that have accompanied agriculture throughout the landscapes in which TSRs occur.

Connectivity is a major factor in the NSW slopes regions, where TSRs take the form of linear routes that stretch across the landscape. However, inter-reserve connectivity is not the major driver of their value on the tablelands, where the vast majority of reserves are blocks of up to 60 ha in size, and usually about 15 kilometres or so apart (a day's walk for a mob of stock). Rather, the value of tableland and eastern slopes TSRs is as remnants of communities that are greatly diminished and for their potential for access to the public as conservation reserves and potential for educational resources, both for the general public, schools and scientists.

The connectivity value of travelling stock reserves, as distinct from routes, is that they act as nodes in the landscapes in which they occur; landscapes that often contain remnant vegetation of lesser integrity that are often fragmented. Recent research on connectivity (see, for example Doer et al, 2010; Doerr et al, 2013; Barret & Love, 2012; Love et al. 2016) has shown that for species in the endangered woodland communities typically found in TSRs, connectivity can be by stepping stones. Depending on the species, gaps between remnants, isolated trees and other structural forms of connectivity can be up to 100m in width. The large size of some TSRs, relative to other remnants of the EECs in the lower parts of their landscapes, mean that they can be viable breeding sites for many fauna species and large populations of flora species that otherwise do not occur in fragmented landscapes. The breeding and foraging sites that the TSRs afford to wildlife species act as focus points for these species in their otherwise fragmented landscapes. Many woodland bird species in the slopes and tablelands have been documented to be in decline (Reid, 1999). Reid specifically mentions the value of TSRs for conservation.

TSRs also act as important reference sites, providing ecologists with opportunities to study less disturbed samples of the EECs in the lowest parts of the landscape in which they occur.

The following websites are links to EEC profiles and provide information about some of the EECs that occupy many of the TSRs in NSW:

Natural Temperate Grassland: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/threatenedSpeciesApp/profile.aspx?id=20260

Box-Gum Woodland: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/threatenedSpeciesApp/profile.aspx?id=10837

Grey Box Woodland: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/threatenedSpeciesApp/profile.aspx?id=20072

Snow Gum Grassy Woodland: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.athreatenedSpeciesApp/profile.aspx?id=20259

Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/threatenedSpeciesApp/profile.aspx?id=20040

Weeping Myall Woodland: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/threatenedSpeciesApp/profile.aspx?id=10973

Note that some EECs are listed as critically endangered under the EPBC Act, including:

Natural Temperate Grassland: http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/communities/pubs/152-conservation-advice.pdf

Box-Gum Woodland: http://www.environment.gov.au/cgi-bin/sprat/public/publicshowcommunity.pl?id=43

Category 1 – Which TSR are used for travelling stock purposes, emergency management or biosecurity? and Category 2 – Which TSRs are used for travelling stock and other purposes?

FOG is concerned about changing grazing regimes on TSRs with high conservation values. As indicated in our previous submissions, we are aware of increased weed invasion in some sites, as well as declines in the ground-layer flora, following changes in grazing regimes. This is particularly an issue with greater pressure associated with the introduction of long-term grazing on the reserves. We are also concerned that with the loss of some TSRs (those identified as Category 4), there may be greater pressure from grazing and/or other agricultural practices put on remaining TSRs. It is well documented that the addition of fertilisers, increasing soil disturbances (e.g., through ploughing and recreational uses) and high stocking rates have a significant impact on native vegetation and habitat (Dorrough et al. 2008); the majority of TSRs have not been subject to these disturbances. The conservative grazing regimes previously applied to TSRs, the lack of addition of fertilisers and the general lack of soil disturbances are recognised as the main reason that these oases of native biodiversity remain in the landscape.

Page 11: Category 3 - which TSRs are not required for travelling stock purposes but are important for other reasons?

The utilitarian values of TSRs versus their conservation values

While there is discussion of conservation and other uses for TSRs and recognition of these uses under category 3, there is a focus generally throughout the text of the NSW Travelling Stock Reserves Review Public consultation paper on the utilitarian values rather than the non-utilitarian values of TSRs. This assumes that TSRs only have a utilitarian function; one to serve only human needs. It has long been recognised by ecologists in NSW and throughout Australia that TSRs have a very important conservation function that is quite discrete from any direct human needs. Many studies point to indirect benefits also of such remnants in a largely modified landscape, including providing habitat for small birds which assist in insect control in neighbouring pasture and crops, erosion containment and improvement of water quality. 

The majority of TSRs on NSW’s tablelands and slopes contain vegetation that falls into a variety of Commonwealth- and State-listed threatened ecological communities. Some of these communities are listed as critically endangered. The samples of these endangered ecological communities (EECs) are in many cases the largest and best samples of these communities occurring on public lands throughout the regions in which they occur – the jewels in the crown. Moreover, the TSR network also provides habitat for many species listed as threatened, also under NSW or Commonwealth legislation. Not recognising these critically important values, and only regarding whether TSRs have a local utilitarian use (e.g., grazing, recreation, beekeeping) ignores the vital roles these parcels of land have and will continue to have in conserving NSW’s biodiversity. This is even more critical currently, when the NSW Government is in the process of introducing legislation that may reduce the protection of native vegetation in the rural landscape.

Another assumption is that local TSRs have only value to local communities. This ignores the fact that our biodiversity ultimately belongs to the people of NSW and to the entire nation, if not globally. The conservation value of TSRs is of concern also not only to current generations but to those of the future. Conservation values need to be protected wherever they exist. Managers of TSRs have obligations under NSW and Commonwealth legislation to protect these values.

Funding

In relation to page 11 – “Category 3 - which TSRs are not required for travelling stock purposes but are important for other reasons?” – an important consideration for high conservation TSRs is that there is sufficient funding available to manage them in such a way that their values are retained. Where such TSRs adjoin national parks and nature reserves, they should be transferred to the management of the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service. Where such TSRs are retained, they have additional connectivity and buffering values, and may serve to increase the area of the native vegetation that is formally protected in the adjacent national park or reserve. In these cases, the NSW government should also consider increasing the NPWS budget to allow for the additional area being managed. These areas may also retain other conservation values, including old-growth trees that provide important habitat for a diversity of native species, many of which provide important ecosystem services; clearing of old-growth trees is listed as a threatening process in NSW (see Loss of Hollow-bearing Trees - key threatening process determination.  NSW Scientific Committee - final determination 2007). 

TSRs with high conservation values could become offset sites for developments, under the Biodiversity Conservation Act 2016 currently being introduced in NSW. The funding made available through the offsets will enable effective land management (weed control, fencing, dam maintenance, etc.), while enabling sustainable grazing by local graziers or by travelling stock to continue.

For the TSRs network as a whole, it is important to maintain adequate funding to ensure that values are maintained. In FOG’s observation, invasion by a range of weeds is undoubtedly the most pressing concern and adequate funding needs to be sourced for continuing weed control.

Options for management

There are a number of options for management that should be explored. These are listed below.

1.       Sites with high conservation values should not be placed into long-term grazing leases, unless grazing is adequately managed (in relation to intensity, frequency and addition of fertilisers or soil disturbance).

2.       TSRs with high conservation values should have management that is sympathetic to those values. This does not preclude a replication of grazing patterns that were applied in times when travelling stock were used exclusively. This includes applying short-term grazing to replicate grazing by travelling stock, in the form of pulse grazing, using large numbers of stock for short periods, preferably applied in a period from late summer to autumn, to prevent grazing destroying seeding potential of the plants present.

3.       Sites with high conservation values require on-going weed control.

4.       TSRs with high conservation values may also act as valuable education resources, being readily accessible sites for schools and local community groups to learn about the local environment, and in particular, the value of conserving EECs. Many will provide opportunities for research studies on applications of management techniques to retain biodiversity in EECs.

5.       Some sites may be important to local Aboriginal communities, as places where bush-tucker plants could be grown and harvested. Note that this is already occurring in some TSRs in the Southern Tablelands (see http://www.bundianway.com.au/yamfields.htm). Others are likely to contain other culturally significant values such as old campsites, artefacts, marked or manipulated trees or important ceremonial areas. In many cases people other than local Aboriginal communities may not be aware of these matters.

6.       TSRs with high biodiversity values may be important as parts of local networks that could be developed for ecotourism purposes, much like “bird routes” that have been developed in some regions (e.g., Narrabri Shire at http://www.visitnarrabri.com.au/bird-routes/; Cowra at https://www.cowratourism.com.au/bird-watching/; the Riverina region at http://www.visitwagga.com/__data/assets/pdf_file/0017/52046/RSWSNT-BirdTrailsBooklet.pdf). Ecotourism at these sites could focus on wildflowers, birds, reptiles and other values that these local networks contain, including as samples of endangered communities in a state resembling that which occurred prior to agricultural development.

7.       Importantly, FOG does not see any conflict between the conservation value of TSRs and sustainable grazing use. FOG understands, and this is supported by the evidence, that the short-term but sometimes intense periods of grazing have resulted in the existing conservation values of the reserves. Having said that, FOG also urges that the limited number of TSRs still existing where no grazing occurs and hasn’t occurred for many years should continue to be withheld from grazing. Such reserves contain some of the few samples of EECs where such management exists, representing special cases that deserve special attention. What is important is that management plans be developed for each site that reflect their existing values and aim to maintain those values. These plans need to be flexible, recognising that the ecological understanding of impacts of management are continuously being improved and changes may be required. For example, as our knowledge of the use of fire improves it may be important to consider whether areas long-unburnt would benefit from ecological burns.

Page 14: Proposals to access TSR land - Criteria for assessing proposals that may impact TSR land

This section of the paper deals only with the value of TSRs for their primary use as part of travelling stock networks and not with the generally recognised ecological values that many TSRs possess. Any assessment of the TSR network’s biodiversity values needs to be consistent with the newly introduced Biodiversity Conservation Act 2016. As discussed above, this may include consideration that TSRs with high conservation values to be suitable sites to receive offset funding to secure those values into the future. FOG thus responds to the discussion point question – “Are these proposed criteria adequate for considering whether a proposal might impact on a TSR?” – in the negative. Any assessment must consider the biodiversity values present on the TSR being impacted.

In this context, FOG believes that, for a number of reasons, some TSRs are already being used without appropriate assessment and application of criteria, e.g., some are not being used for travelling stock but rather, by neighbouring landholders under short- or long-term grazing permits.

FOG recommends that grazing leases not be allowed on TSRs until their conservation status is known and, in the case of those with high quality native vegetation, not be allowed at all (other than as a management tool that is part of a long term management plan for the TSR). In each case where grazing is to continue on high conservation status TSRs this must be only in compliance with a site specific management plan.

In addition, FOG believes that point 5 does not adequately address conservation values. The difficulty with the criterion of “Would not significantly deteriorate …” is that it allows for a gradual deterioration over time, with the end result being loss of conservation values and important conservation sites. FOG’s view is that:

  1. This criterion should specify that such deterioration should not occur in the long term;
  2. This criterion should take into account potential deterioration; and
  3. There needs to be an additional criterion along the lines of “Would not lead to any reduction in condition or biodiversity of TSRs containing threatened species or ecosystems (listed either in New South Wales or federally)”.

Furthermore, measures of condition should be developed and implemented to ensure deterioration to species or ecosystems does not occur. We do not believe that there is any situation in which the impacts on conservation values could or should be outweighed by other considerations.

Restriction of public access

FOG is also aware that some TSRs are already being used as grazing leases, and public access is being restricted. The following photos illustrate a case where this is occurring in what is obviously good quality grassy woodland, worthy of protection for its values. In addition, the signs put up by permit-holders appear to restrict public access. There appears nothing in the Local Lands Services Act, 2013 that enables this to occur. Furthermore, FOG members have noticed some TSRs from which the TSR signs have been removed, making the sites look like private land, and thus also restricting public access.

  

Page 16: Next steps – State-wide assessment of TSRs

Extent of assessment

TSRs occur strategically across the landscape, often within lowland areas that have been heavily subjected to change or destruction as a result of agriculture, development and infrastructure. Many contain remnants of vegetation and habitat that are poorly represented within the regions in which the TSRs occur. While they may contain listed threatened ecosystems, others contain particularly diverse and ‘clean’ remnants of other ecosystems. All should be assessed on their merits to ensure long term retention of all TSRs of conservation value – not only those containing threatened species and ecosystems (including those that may be listed in future under NSW legislation, such as Natural Temperate Grassland) but also TSRs containing highly diverse and high quality ecosystems that are not listed and those with remnants that form important stepping stones across otherwise fragmented and highly modified landscapes.  

Prior assessments

Any State-wide assessment of the TSR network must consider their biodiversity values in a robust, comprehensive manner, and using experienced professional ecologists who have a very good understanding about endangered ecological communities and threatened and other species (i.e., how to identify them, how they function and how to manage and restore them, including effective weed management). Assessments should draw on the many reports compiled previously over the last two and a half decades The NSW Travelling Stock Reserves Review needs to be aware that many conservation assessments have already been carried out many TSRs throughout NSW. These have covered many of the former RLPB regions. Criteria for assessing biodiversity values have long been accepted. The NSW Office of Environment and Heritage has standardised assessment procedures through the NSW Vegetation Information System (see http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/resources/nativeveg/10060nvinttypestand.pdf). Any assessment of TSRs must use existing assessment methodologies. Professional and suitably qualified volunteer ecologists should be engaged to properly assess TSRs throughout NSW to quantify their conservation values.

One major assessment previously undertaken is a compilation of information distilled from many previous site assessments of TSRs throughout NSW and was carried out using Commonwealth funding. This review, undertaken by the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (NSW OEH) Queanbeyan, comprehensively collated all available previous ecological assessments of TSRs. This assessment has been available online for several years at http://www.gbwcmn.net.au/node/6 (follow the “Travelling Stock Route sites” link). Other information on this website includes a comprehensive GIS layer showing the information on the above-mentioned spreadsheet, as well as comprehensive metadata.

This assessment is now becoming increasing out of date as new EECs are being introduced. This submission presents an appended version of this spreadsheet, showing new fields that include data as required by the review. The spreadsheet (Attachment C) and this condensed version (Attachment B), show information on a limited number of TSRs that FOG has information on, and that time allowed for the compilation of the data. It would be possible to compile similar data for many other TSRs.

In Attachments B and C, FOG has focussed on a number of TSRs in south-eastern NSW and additional fields have been supplied, based on personal knowledge (see below for ecologists familiar with these TSRs who have provided additional information). To respond to the Review’s requirement in this submission of “uses of local reserves”, a field identifies whether the site has “high” or “some” conservation value. Other fields focus on connectivity and ecological values. Additional fields also include, if information exists, whether and what threatened and otherwise significant species occur, and whether any previously unidentified NSW or Commonwealth EECs are known to occur at the site, with the EEC’s name included. References to the location of the previously collected detailed flora data are provided. These data are held in the NSW Vegetation Information System (VIS), available at: http://www.bionet.nsw.gov.au//. The data can be accessed through either the NSW Wildlife Atlas at http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/atlaspublicapp/UI_Modules/ATLAS_/AtlasSearch.aspx, or via the VIS Flora Survey search at http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/atlaspublicapp/UI_Modules/YETI_/FloraSearch.aspx. Using the Survey ID provided in that site’s search box entitled “Survey name” will return a list of all sites from that survey.

Environmental Trust Project

FOG notes on page 16 that the intention is to do a state-wide assessment of TSRs that includes this consultation process, the results of TSR conservation assessments under the Environmental Trust Project, and advice from targeted stakeholder consultation. One concern with this process is that high conservation value TSRs that are not covered by the Environmental Trust Project will be excluded from the assessment and their values will not be taken into account. There appears to be no explicit recognition of listed threatened species and ecosystems in this process. In particular, grassland communities such as Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands are listed as a Critically Endangered Ecological Community under the Commonwealth’s Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act, but not currently listed under New South Wales legislation, so could be excluded from the process.

References

Doerr, V.A.J., Doerr, E.D. and Davies, M.J. (2010) Does structural connectivity facilitate dispersal of native species in Australia’s fragmented terrestrial landscapes? CEE review 08-007 (SR44). Collaboration for Environmental Evidence: www.environmentalevidence.org/SR44.html.

Doerr, V.A.J., Williams, K.J., Drielsma, M., Doerr, E.D., Davies, M.J., Love, J., Langston, A., Low Choy, S., Manion, G., Cawsey, E.M., McGinness, H.M., Jovanovic, T., Crawford, D., Austin, M. and Ferrier, S. (2013) Designing landscapes for biodiversity under climate change: Final report National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility, Gold Coast, 260 pp.

Dorrough, J., Stol, J. and McIntyre, S. (2008) Biodiversity in the Paddock: a Land Managers Guide. Future Farm Industries CRC.

Barrett, T. and Love, J. (2012) Fine Scale Modelling of Fauna Habitat and ConnectivityValues in the ACT Region. Prepared for Conservation Planning and Research, Environment and Sustainable Development Directorate, ACT Government. NSW Office of Environment and Heritage.

Love, J., Taylor, S., Drielsma, M., Rehwinkel, R. and Moyle, K. (2016) Southern Rivers NRM Stream 1 Habitat and Connectivity Modelling Project; The mapping of fauna habitat and connectivity values in the South East Local Land Services area. Prepared for NSW South East Local Land Services by University of New England and NSW Office of Environment and Heritage. 

Reid, J. (1999) Threatened and Declining Birds in the New South Wales Sheep-Wheat Belt: 1. Diagnosis, Characteristics and Management A consultancy report prepared for the New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service through Threatened Species Unit funding. CSIRO Wildlife and Ecology

FOG experts

The following are ecologists who are members of FOG that have contributed to the assessments of TSRs in NSW (including original surveys and additional information:


Attachment B

Table 1 is an extract of the appended version of the spreadsheet that can be sourced at: http://www.gbwcmn.net.au/node/6. Attachment C has more detailed information on TSRs in south-eastern NSW.

The relevant fields, and their explanations listed in the following tables are as follows, with the following being fields as in the online spreadsheet:

TSR_NAME         Travelling stock reserve name (2)

RLPB                   Former Rural Lands Protection Board (RLPB)

ID_NO                 Identifier

BIO_CV_2           Biodiversity conservation value code 2; H=high, M=medium; L=low (according to assessments listed in CV_2_REF = professional ecological assessors)

COM_EEC_1      First Commonwealth EEC identified (data as in website). Note that the endangered ecological community entitled Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and ACT has been superseded by a new listing under the EPBC Act as critically endangered Natural Temperate Grassland of the South-Eastern Highlands.

COM_EEC_2      Second Commonwealth EEC identified (data as in website)

NSW_EEC_1       First NSW-listed EEC identified (data as in website)

NSW_EEC_2       Second NSW-listed EEC identified (data as in website)

The following fields constitute new data that has been added by FOG for this submission:

HIGH_VAL          Conservation values (High=high value; Some=some of site only, or some aspects of the site) that have been identified in surveys for which FOG has immediate knowledge or documented evidence of (either because the site has been surveyed by a FOG member, or has been visited as Some of a FOG field day). These sites have similar sets of data (i.e., species surveys, threatened species records, connectivity values, etc) as those sites with more detail, but more time is required to fill in these details.

EEC_NEW_1       Previously not listed EEC (1) - Australian Government-listed or NSW-listed for the TSR (Rehwinkel, pers. comm).

EEC_NEW_2       Previously not listed EEC (2) - Australian Government-listed or NSW-listed for the TSR (Rehwinkel, pers. comm).

THR_SPP             Threatened species present. Flora data from NSW Bionet (NSW VIS: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/atlaspublicapp/UI_Modules/YETI_/FloraSearch.aspx), and fauna records from Rainer Rehwinkel (1995 to 2017) either in NSW Bionet (Atlas of NSW Wildlife: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/atlaspublicapp/UI_Modules/ATLAS_/AtlasSearch.aspx), or in process of being lodged into NSW Bionet.

SIGN_FAUNA_FLORA_SPP          ROTAP flora species and regionally rare, declining or significant fauna and flora species. Flora data from NSW Bionet (NSW VIS: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/atlaspublicapp/UI_Modules/YETI_/FloraSearch.aspx), and fauna records from Rainer Rehwinkel (1995 to 2017) either in NSW Bionet (Atlas of NSW Wildlife: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/atlaspublicapp/UI_Modules/ATLAS_/AtlasSearch.aspx), or in process of being lodged into NSW Bionet. Significant flora are those identified through the process of developing the Floristic Value Score method (see: http://www.environment.gov.au/cgi-bin/sprat/public/publicshowcommunity.pl?id=152). In the case of "declining woodland birds", any TSR that has woodland or dry forest is highly likely to be habitat for this set of species (see Reid, 1999).

SURVEY_CODE_&_SITE_NO        Survey codes for available data in NSW Wildlife Atlas and/or Atlas of Living Australia. Use "Survey Codes" to find sites in NSW VIS (http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/atlaspublicapp/UI_Modules/YETI_/FloraSearch.aspx), NSW Wildlife Atlas (http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/atlaspublicapp/UI_Modules/ATLAS_/AtlasSearch.aspx) and Atlas of Living Australia (http://www.ala.org.au/). Use "Site Numbers"to find sites in NSW VIS.

CONNECT_VAL Connectivity values that have been identified in surveys for which FOG has immediate knowledge or documented evidence of (either because the site has been surveyed by a FOG member, or has been visited as part of a FOG field day).

ECOL_VAL           Other ecological values that have been identified in surveys for which FOG has immediate knowledge or documented evidence of (either because the site has been surveyed by a FOG member, or has been visited as part of a FOG field day).

ENV_WORKS     Environmental works undertaken at this reserve.

The new fields in the spreadsheet (Attachment C) and their values can be appended back to the original online spreadsheet for use in the GIS layers that also appear at http://www.gbwcmn.net.au/node/6. Also note that the field, “CV_2_REF” in the online version (displayed in the spreadsheet in Attachment C) shows references for assessments previously undertaken and that sites with no data in any cells are most likely those NOT surveyed, or if surveyed are likely to be those TSRs that are very small (i.e., less than c. 5 ha) and have very few if any identified values. For references, see the metadata at: http://gbwcmn.net.au/sites/default/files/tsr-sites/TSR_CONSERVATION_VALUE_metadata.pdf.

 


Table 1, part 1

TSR_NAME RLPB ID_NO HIGH VAL COM_EEC_1 (data as in website) COM_EEC_2 (data as in website)
15 Mile Bobundara Rd COOMA 58 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT  
Duck Flat 1 BRAIDWOOD 43 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the Australian Capital Territory  
Duck Flat 2 BRAIDWOOD 43 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the Australian Capital Territory  
Sweeneys BRAIDWOOD 42 High White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland  
Steves BOMBALA 34 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT  
Six Mile Bungendore BRAIDWOOD 26 High White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland  
McLaughlin River Bottom BOMBALA 7 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT  
Avon Lake BOMBALA 8 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the Australian Capital Territory Upland Wetlands of the New England Tablelands and the Monaro Plateau
Tarengo YOUNG 174 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the Australian Capital Territory White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland
Gundary GOULBURN 52 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT  
Doughboy BRAIDWOOD 21 High White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland  
Gilberts Creek BRAIDWOOD 1 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT  
Kangiara YASS 20 High White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland  
Maffra Lake COOMA 55 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the Australian Capital Territory Upland Wetlands of the New England Tablelands and the Monaro Plateau
Nanima YASS 50 High White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the Australian Capital Territory
Reedy Creek Large BRAIDWOOD 46 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the Australian Capital Territory  
Top Hut COOMA 6 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT  
Gidleigh BRAIDWOOD 24 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the Australian Capital Territory White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland
Collector GOULBURN 30 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the Australian Capital Territory  
Back Creek BRAIDWOOD 2 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland
4 Mile Nimmitabel Road COOMA 64 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT  
Black Flat COOMA 68 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT  
Broadway YASS 30 High White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland  
Cowpers Creek GOULBURN 43 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the Australian Capital Territory White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland
Eedys New YASS 19 High White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the Australian Capital Territory
Laggan GOULBURN 5 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland
Native Dog Bottom BOMBALA 0 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT  
Native Dog Top BOMBALA 3 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT  
Ando BOMBALA 4 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT  
Meatworks BOMBALA 2 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the Australian Capital Territory  
Brooks Hill BRAIDWOOD 25 High    
13 Mile Shannons Flat Road COOMA 98 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT  
McInerney's YASS 27 High White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland  
Merryville YASS 53 High White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland  
Moonbah COOMA 43 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT  
Rocky Plain COOMA 26 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT  
Round Plain COOMA 24 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT  
Wargeila YASS 28 High White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland  
Bowning YASS 36 High White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland  
Chain-o-Ponds YASS 44 High White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the Australian Capital Territory
Cobbin COOMA 42 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the ACT  
Coolalie YASS 43 High White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland  
Currawang GOULBURN 31 High Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and the Australian Capital Territory White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland
Pine Valley COOMA 39 High    

 


Table 1, part 2

TSR_NAME NSW_EEC_1 EEC_NEW_1 EEC_NEW_2 THR_SPP
15 Mile Bobundara Rd   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community)   Tympanocryptis pinquicolla, Leucochrysum albicans var. tricolor, Calotis glandulosa, Swainsona sericea
Duck Flat 1   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions Petroica boodang, Eucalyptus aggregata
Duck Flat 2   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions Petroica boodang, Eucalyptus aggregata
Sweeneys White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions Callocephalon fimbriatum, Petroica boodang, Artamus cynopterus
Steves   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions Prasophyllum petilum, Thesium australe, Petroica boodang, Petroica phoenicea, Callocephalon fimbriatum
Six Mile Bungendore White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions Callocephalon fimbriatum, Petroica boodang, Petroica phoenicea, Artamus cyanopteris; Leucochrysum albicans var. tricolor
McLaughlin River Bottom White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions Petroica boodang, Petroica phoenicea, Dodonaea procumbens, Leucochrysum albicans var. tricolor
Avon Lake   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community)   Tympanocryptis pinguicolla, Suta flagellum, Leucochrysum albicans var. tricolor
Tarengo White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community)   Prasophyllum petilum, Synemon plana, Polytelis swainsonii
Gundary   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community)   Delma impar, Rutidosis leptorrhynchoides, Leucochrysum albicans var. tricolor
Doughboy White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions Petroica boodang
Gilberts Creek   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions Calotis glandulosa
Kangiara White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland     Melanodryas cucullata, Artamus cyanopterus
Maffra Lake   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community)   Pelargonium sp. (G.W. Carr 10345), Calotis glandulosa, Stictonetta naevosa, Epthianura albifrons, Stagenopleura guttata, Petroica phoenicea, Petroica boodang
Nanima White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community)   Synemon plana, Anthochaera phrygia, Callocephalon fimbriatum
Reedy Creek Large White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions To be compiled
Top Hut   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community)   Calotis glandulosa, Leucochrysum albicans var. tricolor
Gidleigh White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions Callocephalon fimbriatum, Petroica boodang, Petroica phoenicea, Stagenopleura guttata
Collector   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions To be compiled
Back Creek White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions Callocephalon fimbriatus, Petroica boodang,  Leucochrysum albicans var. tricolor, Calotis glandulosa, Eucalyptus aggregata
4 Mile Nimmitabel Road   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community)   Tympanocryptis pinguicolla
Broadway White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland     To be compiled
Cowpers Creek White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions Leucochrysum albicans var. tricolor, Eucalyptus aggregata
Eedys New White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community)   Aprasia parapulchella, Polytelis swainsonii
Laggan White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions Eucalyptus aggregata
Native Dog Bottom   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions Callocephalon fimbriatum, Petroica boodang, Petroica phoenicea, Swainsona sericea
Native Dog Top   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions Callocephalon fimbriatum, Petroica boodang, Petroica phoenicea, Swainsona sericea
Ando   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community)   To be compiled
Brooks Hill   White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Grassy Woodland and Derived Native Grassland Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) artamus cyanopterus, Petroica boodang
13 Mile Shannons Flat Road   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions To be compiled
McInerney's White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland     To be compiled
Merryville White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland     Polytelis swainsonii, Artamus cyanopterus
Moonbah   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions This information can be compiled for this site
Rocky Plain   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions To be compiled
Round Plain   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions To be compiled
Wargeila White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland     Ammobium craspedioides
Bowning White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland     Swiansona sericea
Cobbin   Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community) Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions To be compiled
Coolalie White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland     To be compiled
Currawang White Box-Yellow Box-Blakely's Red Gum Woodland Natural Temperate Grassland of the South Eastern Highlands (Critically Endangered Ecological Community)   To be compiled
Pine Valley   Tablelands Snow Gum, Black Sallee, Candlebark and Ribbon Gum Grassy Woodland in the South Eastern Highlands, Sydney Basin, South East Corner and NSW South Western Slopes Bioregions   Calotis glandulosa, Petroica boodang, Petroica phoenicea, Chthonicola sagittata

 


Table 1, part 3

TSR_NAME CONNECT_VAL ECOL_VAL
15 Mile Bobundara Rd A vital node of high integrity Natural Temperate Grassland within a landscape with Natural Temperate Grassland of varying quality; high quality Natural Temperate Grassland exists in an immediately adjacent property A large and diverse site; arguably the best sample of its community in the Monaro Plains
Duck Flat 1 Connectivity exists via stepping-stones, roadside reserves and adjacent patches of woodland A large and intact site (2 paddocks) with a very good sample of endangered Tablelands Snow Gum Grassy Woodland with a highly diverse ground-flora.
Duck Flat 2 Connectivity exists via stepping-stones, roadside reserves and adjacent patches of woodland A large and intact site (2 paddocks) with a very good sample of endangered Tablelands Snow Gum Grassy Woodland with a highly diverse ground-flora.
Sweeneys Provides an important woodland connectivity link across the upper part of the largely clear Bungendore valley A large and very important intact and diverse site with three EECs (two of which are critically endangered under EPBC Act) as well as non-listed forest communities.
Steves This site is a vital node set amid a mosaic of areas containing Natural Temperate Grassland and Tablelands Snow Gum Grassy Woodland with adjacent and stepping-stone connectivity. A large site of very high diversity and integrity, and with one of the five or so known sites for the endangered Prasophyllum petilum in NSW. Contains two EECs, including the critically endangered Natural Temperate Grassland EEC.
Six Mile Bungendore High connectivity value across a partially cleared valley, and an important landscape node. A site containing three endangered ecological communities (two of which are critically endangered under EPBC Act) and an unlisted Forest community that has some large old-growth trees.
McLaughlin River Bottom A vital node of high integrity Natural Temperate Grassland and Tableland Snow Gum Grassy Woodland within a landscape with Natural Temperate Grassland and woodland of varying quality; continuous and stepping-stone connectivity. A site with two EECs (one a critically endangered EPBC-listed community). It is one of the most floristically rich Tablelands Snow Gum Grassy Woodland sites in the district.
Avon Lake A vital node of high integrity Natural Temperate Grassland within a landscape with Natural Temperate Grassland of varying quality A very large Natural Temperate Grassland site with high integrity and high diversity.
Tarengo An remnant with some connectivity via an adjacent TSR (Tarengo East), some roadside remnants with similar vegetation and via River Red Gums lining the nearby Boorowa River. Arguably one of the very best samples of Natural Temperate Grassland on any TSR within south-eastern NSW. Exhibits extraordinary diversity and has one of the five known populations of the endangered Prasophyllum petilum. This site is currently unfenced and is only ever subject to travelling stock grazing, which explains its high value.
Gundary A large area of Natural Temperate Grassland set amid largely cleared country; at this site,Natural Temperate Grassland connectivity can be considered to be within-site, because the site is so large. Some lower quality grasslan sites exist in the vicinity. Arguably the largest and best remaining patch of Natural Temperate Grassland in the Goulburn region; certainly the largest and best remaining on public land in the Goulburn region.
Doughboy This TSR is an important node set amid a mosaic of areas containing Tablelands Snow Gum Grassy Woodland, Box-Gum Woodland, Dry Forest and some grassland of lower quality, with adjacent and stepping-stone connectivity. A very highly diverse site containing three EECs in addition to Dry Forest.
Gilberts Creek This TSR is an important node set amid a mosaic of areas containing Natural Temperate Grassland of lower quality and Tablelands Snow Gum Grassy Woodland with adjacent and stepping-stone connectivity. A large Natural Temperate Grassland site with high integrity and high diversity, and with scattered trees derived from Tablelands Snow Gum Grassy Woodland.
Kangiara This TSR is an important node, set within a largely cleared landscape (for cropping), but occurs locally within a large remnant that is in turn connected through the wider landscape by stepping-stones (clumps of trees, roadside trees, isolated paddock trees and riparian vegetation). A remnant of Box-Gum with a diverse groundlayer and a locally important site for declining woodland birds.
Maffra Lake A node of high integrity Natural Temperate Grassland within a landscape with Natural Temperate Grassland of varying quality. A site with very high diversity, including Natural Temperate Grassland EEC of high integrity, an Upland Wetland EEC that is host to many waterbirds in season, and one of only five known populations of Pelargonium sp. (G.W. Carr 10345). Several species of threatened wetland, woodland and grassland birds have been recorded here.
Nanima This TSR is an important node in its landscape. Continuous connectivity is afforded by roadside and riparian vegetation, while stepping-stone connectivity is through paddock trees throughout the local landscape. A small but highly diverse TSR with four communities Box-Gum Woodland and Natural Temperate Grassland (both Critically Endangered Ecological Communities), Dry Forest and Riparian Community. It is in moderate to high integrity.
Reedy Creek Large This information can be compiled for this site This information can be compiled for this site
Top Hut A critical node of high diversity set in a landscape with lower quality native grassland and pastures. One of the most floristically rich grassland sites in the Monaro district.
Gidleigh Provides a critical direct connectivity link between the adjacent Turallo Nature Reserve and the wooded hills of Turallo Range to its east and south. A large and highly intact site. A population of Suta flagellum occurs in the adjacent nature reserve, and is highly likely to occur in this TSR. The site should be considered as an addition to the nature reserve estate.
Collector A vital node of high integrity Natural Temperate Grassland and Tableland Snow Gum Grassy Woodland with direct connectivity to Box-Gum Woodland and Dry Forest in an adjacent Crown land site, and set within a landscape with grassland and woodland of varying quality; continuous and stepping-stone connectivity. The wetlands on this site have connectivity through to Lake George. A large site with two floristically rich EECs (one a critically endangered EPBC-listed community), and also important wetlands in chains-of-ponds that continue from above this site and down to Lake George.
Back Creek Provides a critical node in a connectivity link running adjacent to the Shoalhaven River A very large and diverse site with very high integrity, containing a number of EECs (including one listed as Critically Endangered under the EPBC Act), and wetland and forest communities.
4 Mile Nimmitabel Road This TSR is immediately opposite Kuma Nature Reserve, which is the largest reserve conserving Natural Temperate Grassland in the Monaro region.  A Natural Temperate Grassland of moderate diversity, with a population of an endangered reptile species. Other threatened reptiles are likely to occur. This site could be considered to be added to the nature reserve estate to augment KNR's values.
Black Flat This TSR is an important node set amid a mosaic of areas containing Natural Temperate Grassland and Tablelands Snow Gum Grassy Woodland with adjacent and stepping-stone connectivity. This site has a highly diverse Natural Temperate Grassland and Tablelands Snow Gum Grassy Woodland with high integrity.
Broadway This TSR is immediately adjacent to a larger remnant of Box-Gum Woodland and Dry Forest; there is broader landscape connectivity via adjacent woodland remnants and via stepping-stones throughout the district. This site has a highly diverse Box-Gum Woodland with high integrity.
Cowpers Creek This TSR is an important node set amid a mosaic of areas containing Tablelands Snow Gum Grassy Woodland and some Natural Temperate Grassland of lower quality, with adjacent and stepping-stone connectivity. A highly diverse Natural Temperate Grassland and Tablelands Snow Gum Grassy Woodland with high integrity. Possibly the best sample of Natural Temperate Grassland on public land in the district.
Eedys New The Natural Temperate Grassland remnant is not well connected, but may be large enough for inter-site connectivity to be sufficient. The Box-Gum Woodland is connected via adjacent and stepping-stone connectivity throughout the district. A site with moderate diversity but important for its habitat value for Aprasia parapulchella.
Laggan An important node of high integrity Tableland Snow Gum Grassy Woodland and Tall Forest within a landscape with grassland and woodland of varying quality; continuous and stepping-stone connectivity. A large remnant with highly diverse Tablelands Snow Gum Woodland, Natural Temperate Grassland and Dry Forest.
Native Dog Bottom An important node of high integrity Tableland Snow Gum Grassy Woodland and Tall Forest within a landscape with grassland and woodland of varying quality; continuous and stepping-stone connectivity. A large and floristically rich Tablelands Snow Gum Grassy Woodland site with high integrity.
Native Dog Top An important node of high integrity Tableland Snow Gum Grassy Woodland and Tall Forest within a landscape with grassland and woodland of varying quality; continuous and stepping-stone connectivity. A large and floristically rich Tablelands Snow Gum Grassy Woodland site with high integrity.
Ando A node of high integrity Natural Temperate Grassland within a landscape with Natural Temperate Grassland of varying quality; high quality Natural Temperate Grassland exists in a wide roadside reserve opposite this site. A large Natural Temperate Grassland site with high integrity and moderate diversity.
Meatworks This TSR is set in a landscape with high connectivity (immediately adjacent and stepping-stones) of Tablelands Snow Gum Grassy Woodland A site with high integrity, moderate diversity and high connectivity values.
Brooks Hill Immediately adjacent to Brooks Hill Reserve, a Crown reserve for Environmental Protection and Passive Recreation A site with moderate to high diversity. An important value of this site is in extending the values of the adjacent Brooks Hill Reserve.
13 Mile Shannons Flat Road Very high connectivity value, as the forest is connected to existing forest in the vicinity. A Natural Temperate Grassland with high integrity and high diversity, and an adjacent Forest community.
McInerney's This information can be compiled for this site This information can be compiled for this site
Merryville This information can be compiled for this site This information can be compiled for this site
Moonbah This information can be compiled for this site This information can be compiled for this site
Rocky Plain This information can be compiled for this site This information can be compiled for this site
Round Plain This information can be compiled for this site This information can be compiled for this site
Wargeila This information can be compiled for this site This information can be compiled for this site
Bowning This information can be compiled for this site This information can be compiled for this site
Chain-o-Ponds This information can be compiled for this site This information can be compiled for this site
Cobbin This information can be compiled for this site This information can be compiled for this site
Coolalie This information can be compiled for this site This information can be compiled for this site
Currawang This information can be compiled for this site This information can be compiled for this site
Pine Valley This information can be compiled for this site This information can be compiled for this site

 


Table 1, part 4

TSR_NAME SIGN_FAUNA_FLORA_SPP ENV_WORKS SURVEY_CODE_&_SITE_NO
15 Mile Bobundara Rd Calotis anthemoides, Discaria pubescens, Eryngium ovinum, Leptorhynchos elongatus, Podolepis hieracioides, Podolepis jaceoides, Swainsona monticola, Eucalyptus lacrimans   GEDBRAP-GEDB1664; GEDBFFP-GEDB1671; GEDBFFP-GEDB1672; GEDBARMP-MonAR17
Duck Flat 1 Declining woodland birds, Diuris chryseopsis   GEDBFFP-GEDB0460; GEDBFFP-GEDB0461; GEDBRAP-GEDB1373; GEDBFFP-GEDB0377; GEDBFFP-GEDB3114; GEDBRAP-GEDB1375
Duck Flat 2 Declining woodland birds, Diuris chryseopsis   GEDBFFP-GEDB0460; GEDBFFP-GEDB0461; GEDBRAP-GEDB1373; GEDBFFP-GEDB0377; GEDBFFP-GEDB3114; GEDBRAP-GEDB1375
Sweeneys Declining woodland birds, Diuris sulphurea, Eryngium ovinum, Calotis anthemoides   GEDBRAP-GEDB6171; GEDBRAP-GEDB6187; GEDBRAHP-GEDB6188; GEDBFFP-GEDB6189; GEDBFFP-GEDB6190; GEDBFFP-GEDB6191; GEDBRAP-GEDB6192; GEDBRAP-GEDB6194; GEDBLRAP-GEDB6196
Steves Declining woodland birds, Brachyscome aculeata, Brachyscome scapigera, Caesia calliantha, Calotis scabiosifolia var. integrifolia, Coronidium scorpioides, Craspedia variabilis, Dianella longifolia, Discaria pubescens, Diuris behrii, Diuris chryseopsis, Diuris sulphurea, Galium gaudichaudii, Glycine tabacina, Linum marginale, Oreomyrrhis eriopoda, Pimelea glauca, Plantago antarctica, Podolepis jaceoides, Polygala japonica, Pterostylis cycnocephala, Ranunculus lappaceus, Sebaea ovata, Stylidium graminifolium, Thelymitra sp., Velleia paradoxa Long-term monitoring of Prasophyllum petilum has commenced. This site is a Saving Our Species Project Site for Prasophyllum petilum (see: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/-savingourspeciesapp/project.aspx?ProfileID=10666). GEDBRAP-GEDB6109; GEDBRAP-GEDB6110; GEDBRAP-GEDB6114; GEDBFFP-GEDB6115; GEDBFFP-GEDB6116; GEDBPLoc-GEDB3300; GEDBRAP-GEDB0666; GEDBRAP-GEDB6117; GEDBRAP-GEDB6119; GEDBFFP-GEDB6120
Six Mile Bungendore Declining woodland birds, Lalage sueurii, Ajuga australis, Billardiera scandens, Brachyscome rigidula, Calotis anthemoides, Calotis scabiosifolia var. integrifolia, Coronidium scorpioides, Craspedia variabilis, Cryptandra amara, Dichopogon fimbriatus, Dipodium sp., Diuris sulphurea, Eryngium ovinum, Galium gaudichaudii, Hardenbergia violacea, Hovea linearis, Indigofera australis, Microseris lanceolata, Opercularia hispida, Pimelea linifolia, Podolepis hieracioides, Podolepis jaceoides, Pterostylis sp., Stylidium graminifolium, Thysanotus tuberosus, Velleia paradoxa, Xerochrysum viscosum   GEDBRAP-GEDB4198; GEDBRAP-GEDB4201; GEDBRAP-GEDB0671; GEDBRAP-GEDB4203; GEDBRAP-GEDB4211
McLaughlin River Bottom Calotis scabiosifolia var. integrifolia, Swainsona monticola, Velleia paradoxa, Arthropodium milleflorum, Lespedeza juncea, Linum marginale, Cymbopogon refractus   GEDBRAP-GEDB2880; GEDBRAP-GEDB2881; GEDBFFP-GEDB2882; GEDBFFP-GEDB2883; GEDBFFP-GEDB2884; GEDBFFP-GEDB2885; GEDBFFP-GEDB2886; GEDBFFP-GEDB2887; GEDBFFP-GEDB2888; GEDBFFP-GEDB2889
Avon Lake Swainsona behriana, Diuris semilunulata, Leptorhynchos elongatus, Oreomyrrhis argentea, Podolepis jaceoides, Swainsona monticola   GEDBARMP-MonAR14; GEDBRAP-GEDB0246; GEDBFFP-GEDB0247; GEDBRAP-GEDB0248; GEDBFFP-GEDB0249
Tarengo Ajuga australis, Burchardia umbellata, Dianella longifolia, Dichopogon fimbriatus, Dichopogon sp., Diuris dendobioides, Eriochilus cucullatus, Eryngium ovinum, Glycine clandestina, Glycine tabacina, Pimelea glauca, Pterostylis bicolor, Pterostylis cycnocephala, Ranunculus pachycarpus, Sebaea ovata, Swainsona oroboides, Thysanotus tuberosus, Velleia paradoxa Some research plots have been erected, for long-term monitoring of Prasophyllum petilum. This site is a Saving Our Species Project Site for Prasophyllum petilum (see: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/-savingourspeciesapp/project.aspx?ProfileID=10666). Weed control measures under this project have commenced. GEDBPTP-CMN140-1; GEDBRAP-GEDB6265; GEDBRAP-GEDB6266; GEDBRAP-GEDB6267; GEDBRAP-GEDB6269; GEDBFFP-GEDB6270; GEDBRAP-GEDB6271; GEDBRAP-GEDB6272; GEDBRAP-GEDB6273; GEDBFFP-GEDB6288
Gundary Keyacris scurra, Cooraboorama canberrae, Turnix velox, Galium gaudichaudii, Velleia paradoxa, Diuris chryseopsis, Eryngium ovinum, Thelymitra pauciflora, Glycine tabacina, Laxmannia gracilis, Brachyscome rigidula, Brachyscome dentata, Cryptandra amara, Dianella longifolia, Diuris sulphurea, Eriochilus cucullatus, Glycine clandestina, Stylidium graminifolium, Sebaea ovata, Hovea linearis Fencing using advice from OEH officers to restrict and/or control grazing in certain sections of the reserve for conservation of Natural Temperate Grassland EEC and Rutidosis leptorrhynchoides. This site is a Saving Our Species Project Site for Rutidosis leptorrhynchoides (see: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/-savingourspeciesapp/project.aspx?ProfileID=10739).  Some tree planting has occurred. Unfortunately, the species used were inappropriate for the site (either using non-local species, or species not appropriate for the topographic position). Some planting may have impacted on grassland and threatened reptile habitat. GEDBFFP-GEDB1707; GEDBFFP-GEDB2078; GEDBFFP-GEDB2084; GEDBRAP-GEDB1080; GEDBRAP-GEDB1905; GEDBRAP-GEDB1909; GEDBRAP-GEDB1916; GEDBRAP-GEDB1921; GEDBRAP GEDB1929; GEDBFFP-GEDB0473; GEDBFFP-GEDB0474; GEDBFFP-GEDB0475; GEDBRAP-GEDB1940; GEDBRAP-GEDB1941; GEDBRAP-GEDB1944; GEDBRAP-GEDB1945; GEDBRAP-GEDB1951; GEDBRAP-GEDB1074; GEDBFFP-GEDB1952; GEDBFFP-GEDB1953; GEDBFFP-GEDB1955; GEDBFFP-GEDB1956; GEDBFFP-GEDB1957; GEDBFFP-GEDB1958; GEDBFFP-GEDB1959; GEDBFFP-GEDB1960
Doughboy This information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.
Gilberts Creek This information is available for this site. Some tree planting has occurred. Unfortunately, the species used were inappropriate for the site (either using non-local species, or species not appropriate for the topographic position). Some planting may have impacted on grassland and threatened flora habitat. This information is available for this site.
Kangiara Declining woodland birds; flora information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.
Maffra Lake This information is available for this site. This site is a Saving Our Species Project Site for Pelargonium sp. (G.W. Carr 10345) (see: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/-savingourspeciesapp/project.aspx?ProfileID=20147). Weed control under this project has commenced. This information is available for this site.
Nanima Declining woodland birds, Burchardia umbellata, Caladenia cucullata, Calandrinia eremaea, Centrolepis strigosa, Cheiranthera cyanea, Coronidium scorpioides, Craspedia variabilis, Dianella longifolia, Dichopogon fimbriatus, Dipodium punctatum, Diuris behrii, Diuris chryseopsis, Diuris sulphurea, Eryngium ovinum, Genoplesium sp., Hardenbergia violacea, Hovea linearis, Microseris lanceolata, Opercularia hispida, Sebaea ovata, Stylidium graminifolium, Thelymitra pauciflora , Thysanotus patersonii, Thysanotus tuberosus Fencing has been carried out using advice from OEH officers to restrict and/or control grazing in certain sections of the reserve for conservation of Natural Temperate Grassland and Box-Gum Woodland EEC and Synemon plana, and for the control of salinity. GEDBRAP-GEDB3279; GEDBFFP-GEDB0527; GEDBRAP-GEDB3287; GEDBFFP-GEDB3291; GEDBLRAP-GEDB3292; GEDBLRAP-GEDB3294; GEDBRAP-GEDB3299; GEDBRAP-GEDB3302; GEDBFFP-GEDB0568
Reedy Creek Large Declining woodland birds; flora information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.
Top Hut Ajuga australis, Craspedia variabilis, Dillwynia prostrata, Galium gaudichaudii, Hovea linearis, Oreomyrrhis eriopoda, Ranunculus lappaceus, Stylidium graminifolium, Swainsona behriana, Viola betonicifolia, Bossiaea riparia, Calotis scabiosifolia var. integrifolia, Hypericum japonicum, Leptorhynchos elongates, Microseris lanceolata, Muehlenbeckia axillaris, Pimelea glauca, Discaria pubescens, Glycine tabacina, Podolepis jaceoides   GEDBFFP-GEDB6388; GEDBRAP-GEDB6389; GEDBFFP-GEDB6392; GEDBFFP-GEDB6393
Gidleigh Lalage sueurii, Eryngium ovinum, Brachyscome dentata, Calotis anthemoides, Dichopogon fimbriatus, Glycine tabacina, Pimelea glauca, Ajuga australis, Diuris behrii, Diuris chryseopsis, Velleia paradoxa   GEDBRAP-GEDB1789; GEDBRAP-GEDB1791; GEDBRAHP-GEDB0088; GEDBFFP-GEDB2675; GEDBFFP-GEDB2566
Collector Declining woodland birds, Gallinago hardwickii, Dianella longifolia, Dichopogon fimbriatus, Eryngium ovinum, Brachyscome graminea, Calotis anthemoides, Arthropodium milleflorum, Craspedia variabilis, Neopaxia australasica, Arthropodium minus, Glycine tabacina, Stylidium despectum Some tree planting has occurred. Unfortunately, the species used were inappropriate for the site (either using non-local species, or species not appropriate for the topographic position). GEDBFFP-GEDB0446; GEDBFFP-GEDB0447; GEDBRAHP-GEDB1039; GEDBRAP-GEDB1226; GEDBRAP-GEDB1049; GEDBFFP-GEDB1696; GEDBFFP-GEDB1698
Back Creek Declining woodland birds, Ajuga australis, Brachyscome diversifolia, Brachyscome rigidula, Brachyscome scapigera, Calochilus paludosus, Calotis anthemoides, Calotis anthemoides, Centrolepis strigosa, Coronidium scorpioides, Craspedia variabilis, Cryptandra amara, Dichopogon fimbriatus, Diuris behrii, Diuris chryseopsis, Diuris pedunculata, Diuris sulphurea, Eriochilus cucullatus, Galium gaudichaudii, Glycine clandestina,  Gompholobium minus, Gonocarpus micranthus, Goodenia humilis, Hakea microcarpa, Hovea linearis, Laxmannia gracilis, Microseris lanceolata, Ranunculus sp., Stellaria angustifolia, Stylidium graminifolium, Thelymitra pauciflora, Utricularia dichotoma, Villarsia reniformis This site has received Commonwealth funding for weed control. It is also a Saving Our Species project site for Eucalyptus aggregata (see: http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/-savingourspeciesapp/project.aspx?ProfileID=10666) GEDBRAP-GEDB0253; GEDBRAP-GEDB0262; GEDBFFP-GEDB0392; GEDBFFP-GEDB0264; GEDBFFP-GEDB0265; GEDBFFP-GEDB0266; GEDBFFP-GEDB0267; GEDBFFP-GEDB0268
4 Mile Nimmitabel Road This information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.
Black Flat This information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.
Broadway Declining woodland birds; flora information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.
Cowpers Creek This information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.
Eedys New This information is available for this site. Some tree planting has occurred. Unfortunately, the species used were inappropriate for the site (either using non-local species, or species not appropriate for the topographic position). Some planting may have impacted on grassland and threatened reptile habitat. This information is available for this site.
Laggan Declining woodland birds; flora information is available for this site. Some community tree planting has occurred. This information is available for this site.
Native Dog Bottom Cullen microcephalum, Mentha diemenica, Pterostylis sp.   GEDBRAP-GEDB3323; GEDBFFP-GEDB3324; GEDBFFP-GEDB3325; GEDBRAP-GEDB3326
Native Dog Top Cullen microcephalum, Mentha diemenica, Pterostylis sp.   GEDBRAP-GEDB3323; GEDBFFP-GEDB3324; GEDBFFP-GEDB3325; GEDBRAP-GEDB3326
Ando Craspedia variabilis, Oreomyrrhis eriopoda   GEDBRAP-GEDB0210; GEDBARMP-MonAR42; GEDBFFP-GEDB0212
Meatworks Discaria pubescens, Swainsona behriana, Lespedeza juncea,   GEDBRAP-GEDB2891; GEDBFFP GEDB2892
Brooks Hill Cullen tenax   GEDBRAP-GEDB0729
13 Mile Shannons Flat Road This information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.
McInerney's This information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.
Merryville This information is available for this site. Some tree planting has occurred. Unfortunately, the species used were inapproariate for the site (either using non-local species, or species not approapriate for the topographic position). This information is available for this site.
Moonbah This information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.
Rocky Plain Declining woodland birds; flora information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.
Round Plain Declining woodland birds; flora information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.
Wargeila Declining woodland birds; flora information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.
Bowning Declining woodland birds; flora information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.
Chain-o-Ponds Declining woodland birds; flora information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.
Cobbin Declining woodland birds; flora information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.
Coolalie Declining woodland birds; flora information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.
Currawang Declining woodland birds; flora information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.
Pine Valley This information is available for this site.   This information is available for this site.

Attachment C

This attachment is the spreadsheet (NSW_LLS_TSR_Review_FOG_Att_C_20170625.xls - 1MB file). The following provides notes for the spreadsheet.

The spreadsheet is an appended version of a previous State-wide assessment that is available at http://www.gbwcmn.net.au/node/6. It shows all TSRs recognised at the time it was developed and, in additional columns of data, provides FOG’s fuller response to the request of the consultation paper, namely to seek feedback “on the uses and community values of TSRs in each region”. There are additional fields that show newly listed EECs or EECs not previously identified for the site, threatened and significant species known for selected sites, and specific ecological and connectivity values. This spreadsheet also shows whether a site has high conservation value or some conservation value for other sites for which FOG has information for south-eastern NSW. Some sites have had environmental works undertaken on them; this is also included in the spreadsheet. It needs to be recognised by the Review that this type of data is available for many other TSRs across the State. Note that due to time constraints, not all TSRs mentioned in the attachments show the same level of detail. 

The endangered ecological community entitled Natural Temperate Grassland of the Southern Tablelands of NSW and ACT has been superseded by a new listing under the EPBC Act as critically endangered Natural Temperate Grassland of the South-Eastern Highlands.